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Coat Colour DNA bundle: Loci A + B + D1 + E1 + K

Test number: 8654

1 ) Coat Colours: A-Locus Agouti ( fawn, sable, black and tan/tricolor, recessive black)
Breed
All Dog Breeds .
Description

The A locus is responsible for a number of common coat patterns in the dog. Expression of all of them requires any combination of two Ky or Kbr alleles at the K locus, and at least one E or EM allele at the E locus. The gene involved is the Agouti gene, and variations in it are responsible for fawn and sable dogs (Ay), wild type (aw), tan points (at), and recessive black(a).

analysis proves absence or presence of the mutation typically responsible for fawn or sable. In fawn/ sable dogs this test shows if other agouti alleles are present but hidden (only one copy of Ay). It also demonstrates how many copies of this allele are hidden in dogs, which cannot express agouti types (KBKB,  KB  kbr, KB ky, at the k locus and/or ee at the E locus).

shows whether a black dog is black due to “recessive black,” or the more common black at the K locus. It also reveals whether a non-black animal carries “recessive black.” (e.g. German Shepherd Dog, Shetland Sheepdog)

at allele (tan points, tricolors) There is no direct test yet for this recessive allele (, but in some breeds, carriers may be deduced by use of the other two agouti tests. In breeds where only the Ay  and at alleles are present, the Ay test can be used to see if the fawn/sable dog is Ay/Ay (homozygous) or only has one Ay (heterozygous). If it only has one, the other allele must be at. (e.g. Afghans, Collies, Cardigan Welsh Corgi, Dachshund, Norwich Terrier, Staffordshire Terrier) In breeds where only Ay, at and “a” alleles are present, both the Ay test and the “a” test need to be performed. Any alleles unaccounted for by these two tests will be at. For example, if a dog is Ay/Ay both alleles are accounted for. If a fawn/sable dog only has a single Ay, then the other allele must either be an “a” or an at, and this can be determined by running the recessive black (“a”) test. Examples of breeds:< Shetland Sheepdog, Belgians (Malinois, Groenendael).

 
Further reading
Coat Colour Inheritance Chartshtml file
Brittany Coat ColoursPDF file
Sample Requirements
Whole blood in EDTA tube (0.5 - 1 ml) or Buccal Swabs. Whole blood in EDTA tube (0.5 - 1 ml) or Buccal swabs. .
Turnaround
1 - 2 weeks
2 ) Coat Colour: B Locus (Brown Coat Colour)
Breeds
All Dog Breeds , American Cocker Spaniel , Australian Shepherd , Bedlington Terrier , Border collie , Cardigan Welsh Corgi , Dachshund , Dalmatian , Doberman Pinscher , English Cocker Spaniel , Flatcoated Retriever , Fox Terrier , French Bull Dog , Galgo Espanol , German Longhaired Pointer , German Shorthair Pointer , Gordon Setter , Griffon Bruxellois , Irish Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier , Koolie ( Australian Koolie ) , Labrador Retriever , Miniature Pinscher , Newfoundland , Pointer , Portuguese Waterdog , Scottish Terrier , Weimaraner .
Description

The B locus is responsible for the presence of brown, chocolate, or liver coat colour. It is also responsible for nose colour. In breeds where the A locus does not come into play, any dog that has at least one B allele (and is not 'ee'), will be black in the pigmented areas of the coat. If the dog has two copies of any of several b alleles will be brown. There are at least three such b alleles. Regardless of other loci, any dog with at least one B allele will have a black nose and pads, while those with any two b alleles will have a liver nose and pads.

This test checks if the dog carries 0, 1 or 2 copies of the mutations typically responsible for the brown coat colour, which is also known in some breeds as liver, chocolate, sedge, and less frequently, red. There are three primary 'b' mutations that are responsible for nearly every liver or chocolate dog. A notable exception is the French Bulldog where in addition to these three mutations, there is a fourth cause of chocolate that has yet to be identified.

In some breeds such as Gordon Setter this coat colour is referred to as liver.

 
Further reading
Coat Colour Inheritance ChartsHTML file
Brittany Coat ColoursPDF file
B Locus Inheritence ChartPDF file
Sample Requirements
Whole blood in EDTA tube (0.5 - 1 ml) or Buccal Swabs. Whole blood in EDTA tube (0.5 - 1 ml) or Buccal swabs. .
Turnaround
1 - 2 weeks
3 ) Coat Colours: D-Locus D1 ( Dilution )
Breeds
All Dog Breeds , Border collie , Boston Terrier , Bulldog , Chihuahua , Doberman Pinscher , French Bull Dog , German Pinscher , Koolie ( Australian Koolie ) , Labrador Retriever , Large Munsterlander , Miniature Pinscher , Newfoundland , Rhodesian Ridgeback , Staffordshire Bull Terrier .
Description

The D locus is the primary locus associated with diluted pigment, which results in coats that would otherwise be black or brown instead showing up as gray, or blue in the case of black, and pale brown or Isabella in the case of brown. The melanophilin gene has recently been shown to be responsible, but not all of the dilute causing mutations have been identified yet.

A recessive mutation in the melanophilin gene was identified as the cause of colour dilution phenotypes in the dog. Two alleles (variants) are described: the dominant full colour (D) and the recessive dilute (d). Two copies of dilute are needed to lighten black pigment to grey (often called blue) and red pigment to cream (also called buff). A diagnostic DNA test identifies the specific variants of the MLPH gene.

Please note that in the Chow Chow, Rhodesian Ridgeback and Sloughi breeds, there is another mutation that can cause coat colour dilution, it is the D2 Locus mutation and in those breeds both D Locus and D2 Locus mutations must be tested for complete analysis.

 
Further reading
Coat Colour Inheritance Chartshtml file
Sample Requirements
Whole blood in EDTA tube (0.5 - 1 ml) or Buccal Swabs. Whole blood in EDTA tube (0.5 - 1 ml) or Buccal swabs. .
Turnaround
2 - 3 weeks
4 ) Coat Colours: E-Locus E1 (yellow, lemon, red, cream and appricot)
Breeds
Afghan , All Dog Breeds , Australian cattle dog , Australian Shepherd , Beagle , Border collie , Brittany Spaniel , Cardigan Welsh Corgi , Chow Chow , Cocker Spaniel , Dachshund , Dalmatian , Doberman Pinscher , English Cocker Spaniel , English Setter , English Springer Spaniel , Field Spaniel , Flatcoated Retriever , Foxhound , French Bull Dog , German Longhaired Pointer , German Shepherd , German Wirehaired Pointer , Gordon Setter , Koolie ( Australian Koolie ) , Labrador Retriever , Lowchen , Miniature Schnauzer , Pointer , Pomeranian , Poodle , Pudelpointer .
Description

The Coat Colours

As in other mammals, dogs appear to have two major types of pigment in their coat. The basic colours are either dark (brown or black) or yellow. The rich colour varieties seen among dog breeds are due to genes controlling the amount, extent, and distribution of these two colour pigments. In the Labrador- and Flatcoated retriever, three different coat colours are are currently acknowledged- black, brown or yellow.

Please note that in Australian Cattle Dog, anothermutation E Locus E2 is responsible for this coat colour and both E Locus E1 and E2 must be tested in this breed.

The Trait of Inheritance

The three alleles (forms) of this gene are black (E), melanistic mask (Em) and red (e). E and Em are dominant to e, therefore a dog must have 2 copies of e to be red / yellow.

The red/yellow coat colour (e) is inherited in an autosomal-recessive trait.he DNA test offers the detection of carriers which helps prediction of the colour of the offspring. The test does not detect the melanistic mask allele (Em).

 
Further reading
Coat Colour Inheritance Chartshtml file
Brittany Coat ColoursPDF file
Sample Requirements
Whole blood in EDTA tube (0.5 - 1 ml) or Buccal Swabs. Whole blood in EDTA tube (0.5 - 1 ml) or Buccal swabs. .
Turnaround
1 - 2 weeks
5 ) Coat Colours: K- Locus
Please note that this test will only check for the KB and ky alleles, it does not check for the kbr (brindle). Laboklin no longer offers a test for Brindle.
Breed
All Dog Breeds .
Description

The K locus plays a pivotal role in coat colour. This locus is a relative newcomer in our understanding of canine colour, and includes traits formerly attributed by some to other genes.

The dominant allele in the series is KB, which is responsible for self-colouring, or solid coloured fur in pigmented areas. This trait was formerly attributed to the Agouti (A) locus as AS, but recent breeding studies had shown this not to be the case.

There are two other alleles, kbr, and ky. KB is dominant to both kbr and ky, while kbr is dominant only to ky. kbr is responsible for the brindle. The recessive allele, ky, allows the basic patterns of the A locus to be expressed. So too does the kbr allele, but with brindling of any tan, fawn, or tawny areas. Any animal with at least one KB allele will be self-coloured.

Any animal with at least one kbr allele, and no KB alleles will be brindled on agouti background (see A locus). Any animal with two ky alleles will show agouti patterns (see A locus). and ky


LABOKLIN can presently test for these two alleles. In some breeds, where no brindle is present, this represents a complete analysis of the locus. An example would be the Pug. In breeds where the breed standard disqualifies all but self-colored dogs, testing for these two alleles is once again all that is needed. Any animal with two KB alleles cannot produce anything except self-coloured offspring. A prime example here is the Labrador retriever. In breeds where many variations are allowed, these tests can help predict the probability of potential litters to include fawn, sable, tawny, tan point, tricolor or recessive black puppies.

 
Further reading
Coat Colour Inheritance Chartshtml file
Brittany Coat ColoursPDF file
Sample Requirements
Whole blood in EDTA tube (0.5 - 1 ml) or Buccal Swabs. Whole blood in EDTA tube (0.5 - 1 ml) or Buccal swabs. .
Turnaround
2 - 3 weeks
Price for the above 5 tests
£ 124.00 (including VAT)

To order:

  • Download Order Form from this link pdf

  • Complete the order form and send it together with your samples to the following address:

    Laboklin (UK),   125 Northenden Road, Manchester, M33 3HF

See Also:
Coat Colours: E-Locus E1 (yellow, lemon, red, cream and appricot)  
Coat Colours: A-Locus Agouti ( fawn, sable, black and tan/tricolor, recessive black)  
Coat Colours: D-Locus D1 ( Dilution )  
Coat Colours: K- Locus  
Coat Colours: EM-Locus Melanistic Mask Allele (Em), E-Locus  
Curly Coat  
Furnishings and Improper Coat  
Coat Colour EG- Locus (domino, grizzle)  
Coat Colour: EH-locus (sable)  
Coat Colour: S-locus (piebald, spotted white)*  
Hairlessness  
Harlequin  
Saddle Tan  
Coat (hair) Length I  
Coat (hair) Length II  
Panda White Spotting  
C Locus (Albino)  
Coat Colour: D2 - Locus ( Dilution )  
D Locus D1 + D2 ( Dilution )  
Coat Length I + II ( Long or Shor Hair)  
Coat Colours: E-Locus E2 (Red / Yellow)  
M Locus * / Merle Gene / Dapple (merle / Cryptic Merle)  
Coat Colour: B Locus (Brown Coat Colour)  

 
 
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125 Northenden Road, Manchester, M33 3HF
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